HUMAN, EVER MORE HUMAN. Theology, Biopolitics, and the Market of Subjectivity

2/2016, September ISBN: 9788899871505pp. 66 - 84 DOI: 10.19280/P2016-2-004

Abstract

Within management studies, the ‘human factor’ has shifted from the status of a hindrance to that of a central resource in an age of flexible productivity. While for early Fordism, the point was to rationalize and minimize the human factor, in the phase of liquid capitalism, it becomes the object of all investments, capsizing as it were Nietzsche’s observation on the Human all too human. From now on, the watchword will be: Human, ever more human. The paper elicits the theological background of the project of ‘humanization’ of work, showing how the biopolitical analysis of market behaviour didn’t emerge against, but was rather perfectly in line with the idea of a divine oikonomia, from Linné’s animal economy through Adam Smith’s invisible hand all the way through contemporary models of cybernetic managing. Immanence is not anti-theological per se, but might represent, in a certain respect, the most efficacious form of managerial thinking.

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MLA
Alloa, Emmanuel. "HUMAN, EVER MORE HUMAN. Theology, Biopolitics, and the Market of Subjectivity". Pólemos IX. 2. (2016): 66-84 https://www.rivistapolemos.it/human-always-more-human-theology-biopolitics-and-the-market-of-subjectivity/?lang=en
APA
Alloa, E. (2016). "HUMAN, EVER MORE HUMAN. Theology, Biopolitics, and the Market of Subjectivity". Pólemos IX. (2). 66-84 https://www.rivistapolemos.it/human-always-more-human-theology-biopolitics-and-the-market-of-subjectivity/?lang=en
Chicago
Alloa, Emmanuel. 2016. "HUMAN, EVER MORE HUMAN. Theology, Biopolitics, and the Market of Subjectivity". Pólemos IX (2). Stamen: 66-84. https://www.rivistapolemos.it/human-always-more-human-theology-biopolitics-and-the-market-of-subjectivity/?lang=en
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